Victoria_Cross_of_canada

THE

 

TO THE VICTORIA & GEORGE CROSS

COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE

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b. 18/10/1913 Cork, Ireland. d. 19/09/1944 Arnhem, Holland.

 

David Lord was born on 18 October 1913 in Cork, Ireland, the son of Samuel (a Warrant Officer in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers) and Mary Lord.

 

After the First World War the family were posted to British India and Lord attended Lucknow Convent School. On his father's retirement from the Army the family moved to Wrexham and then David was a pupil at St Mary's College, Aberystwyth before attending the English Ecclesiastical College, Valladolid, Spain to study for the priesthood. Deciding the priesthood was not the career for him he returned to Wrexham before moving to London in the mid 1930s as a freelance writer. He enlisted in the RAF in 1936. He underwent pilot training, becoming a Sergeant Pilot in 1939 with No. 31 Squadron RAF on the North West Frontier, flying the Vickers Valentia biplane. In 1941 No. 31 squadron was the first unit to receive the Douglas DC-2 which was followed by both the Douglas DC-3 and Dakota transports. He flew in the Middle East, (being injured in a crash) before being posted back to India. Commissioned in 1942, he flew on supply missions over Burma.

 

Lord was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross during 1943 and by January 1944 had returned to the UK for service with No. 271 Squadron (based at RAF Down Ampney, Gloucestershire) training to drop paratroops, supplies and to tow military gliders. He then took part in the D-Day operations in June 1944. He was 30 years old, and a Flight Lieutenant in 271 Squadron, Royal Air Force during the Second World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the Victoria Cross.

 

VC ACTION

 

On 19 September 1944 during the Battle of Arnhem in the Netherlands, the British 1st Airborne Division was in desperate need of supplies. Flight Lieutenant Lord, flying Dakota III KG374 through intense enemy anti-aircraft fire was twice hit and had one engine burning. He managed to drop his supplies, but at the end of the run found that there were two containers remaining. Although he knew that one of his wings might collapse at any moment he nevertheless made a second run to drop the last supplies, then ordered his crew to bail out. A few seconds later the Dakota crashed in flames with its pilot and six crew.

 

LOCATION OF MEDAL: LORD ASHCROFT GALLERY, IMPERIAL WAR MUSEUM, LONDON.

BURIAL PLACE: OOSTERBEEK CEMETERY, ARNHEM, HOLLAND.

 

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David Samuel Anthony

Lord VC, DFC

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David Lord's medals including VC and DFC on display at the Lord Ashcroft Gallery, Imperial War Museum

(August 2014).

Arnhem Oosterbeek War Cemetery

Cemetery Plan courtesy of Kevin Brazier

PLOT IV, ROW B, GRAVE 5.

WREXHAM CATHEDRAL

St Mary's Cathedral, Wrexham

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Lord VC Memorial, Wrexham

DOWN AMPNEY CLOSE UP

Down Ampney Church Window

ST CLEMENTS DANES ALDWYCH

St Clements Danes RAF Memorial, Aldwych

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Roy Nockolds Painting of Lord VC over Arnhem

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